Daniel P. Petrylak, MD

Daniel P. Petrylak, MD

Yale University Cancer Center

New Haven, Connecticut

Daniel P. Petrylak, MD, is currently Director of Genitourinary Oncology, Professor of Medicine and Urology, Co-Leader of Cancer Signaling Networks, and Co-Director of the Signal Transduction Program at Yale University Cancer Center in New Haven, Connecticut. He is a recognized international leader in the urology field. He earned his MD at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland Ohio. He then went on to complete his Internal Medicine Residency at Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx, and his fellowship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Dr. Petrylak has served as principal investigator (PI) or co-PI on several SWOG clinical trials for genitourinary cancers. Most notably, he served as the PI for a randomized trial that led to the FDA approval of docetaxel in hormone refractory prostate cancer. He also helped to design and served as PI for the SPARC trial, an international registration trial evaluating satraplatin as a second-line therapy for hormone refractory prostate cancer. Dr. Petrylak served on the program committees for the annual meetings of the American Urological Association from 2003-2011, and for the American Society of Clinical Oncology from 1995-1997 and 2001-2003. He also has served as a committee member for the Devices and Immunologicals section of the FDA. He has published extensively in the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Cancer Research, and Clinical Cancer Research.

Articles by Daniel P. Petrylak, MD

Immunotherapy Trials

Daniel P. Petrylak, MD, Director of Genitourinary Oncology, Professor of Medicine and Urology, Co-Leader of Cancer Signaling Networks, and Co-Director of the Signal Transduction Program at Yale University Cancer Center, discusses the various trials currently evaluating immunotherapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). To this point, Dr. Petrylak explains, there have not been many obvious survival benefits from immunotherapy in prostate cancer, except in patients with specific tumor mutations; therefore, sipuleucel-T and pembrolizumab are currently the only FDA-approved immunotherapeutic agents for CRPC. Fortunately, numerous trials are underway that study more effective ways to use immunotherapies for prostate cancer, including trials to improve sipuleucel-T, trials researching vaccine-based immunotherapy regimens, and numerous combination therapy trials. Dr. Petrylak also discusses alternative approaches to immune treatment, including CAR-T cell and BiTE studies in CRPC.

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Theranostics & Radiopharmaceutical Trials

Daniel P. Petrylak, MD, Director of Genitourinary Oncology, Professor of Medicine and Urology, Co-Leader of Cancer Signaling Networks, and Co-Director of the Signal Transduction Program at Yale University Cancer Center, reviews several studies in which radium-223 is used both alone and in combination with other treatments for prostate cancer. Since radium-223 is an alpha particle, it requires fewer hits to damage DNA, offering an advantage over beta particles. Dr. Petrylak further explains the benefits of theranostics which deliver isotopes directly to the tumor site. He concludes that radium-223 is effective in treating metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), but cautions that until potential toxicity levels are better understood, combining radium-223 with either abiraterone or prednisone is not advised.

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Chemotherapy Trials

Daniel P. Petrylak, MD, Director of Genitourinary Oncology, Professor of Medicine and Urology, Co-Leader of Cancer Signaling Networks, and Co-Director of the Signal Transduction Program at Yale University Cancer Center in New Haven, Connecticut, discusses data from recent chemotherapy trials for castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Dr. Petrylak specifically examines trials evaluating drug combinations as treatment for CRPC patients. Additionally, he reviews the effectiveness of PARP inhibitors in patients with DNA repair mutations. Finally, he notes the apparent superiority of cabazitaxel to NG AA treatment after progression on docetaxel.

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Phase 1 Trial of ARV-110 in Patients with mCRPC

Daniel P. Petrylak, MD, Director of Genitourinary Oncology, Professor of Medicine and Urology, Co-Leader of Cancer Signaling Networks, and Co-Director of the Signal Transduction Program at Yale University Cancer Center, discusses promising new developments coming out of a trial that interferes with the androgen receptor and degrades it. Phase 1 of this trial looks at ARV-110 in patients with mCRPC and Dr. Petrylak highlights why the study’s recent findings are so exciting. He goes into detail the study methodology and how ARV-110 works in comparison to traditional treatments. Dr. Petrylak also explains why the findings are so promising and what the next steps are for the study.

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Anti-Androgen Trials

Daniel P. Petrylak, MD, Director of Genitourinary Oncology, Professor of Medicine and Urology, Co-Leader of Cancer Signaling Networks, and Co-Director of the Signal Transduction Program at Yale University Cancer Center, gives an overview of the most important, recent anti-androgen trials, as well as those that are currently still underway. He highlights how the trials were conducted, what the researchers found, and what he feels is still missing from the research. Dr. Petrylak compares and contrasts the different studies and draws conclusions about each. He also goes over a couple of trials with novel anti-androgens with unique mechanisms of action, which are currently in phase 1, that are showing promise.

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