E. David Crawford, MD

E. David Crawford, MD

Editor-in-Chief
Grand Rounds in Urology
Professor of Urology
University of California, San Diego

San Diego, California

E. David Crawford, MD, is a Professor of Urology at the University of California, San Diego. He is an internationally renowned urologist, and the former distinguished endowed Professor of Surgery, Urology, and Radiation Oncology, and Head of the Section of Urologic Oncology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, Colorado. Dr. Crawford is an expert in benign prostate hypertrophy, urologic cancers, and in particular, prostate cancer. He has authored many scientific articles, as well as textbooks and book chapters. He has served as an editorial reviewer or consultant for many publications, including Urology, Journal of Urology, and the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Crawford is a member of many organizations, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Urological Association (AUA), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He is the Founder and Chairman of the Prostate Conditions Education Council, which is responsible for raising awareness and screening of millions of men for prostate health issues. He has received many awards, including the CaP CURE Annual Award for Scientific Presentation, and has twice been presented with a “Freddie Award” for best medical documentaries. He has long been recognized as one of the Best Doctors of America and is recognized as one of the top 20 urologists in the country for men by Men’s Health Magazine.

Articles by E. David Crawford, MD

Urologic Debate Part 2: MRI vs. Molecular Markers: Which One Should I Use? Markers Perspective

In the second part of this urologic debate, E. David Crawford, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Grand Rounds in Urology and Professor of Urology at the University of California, San Diego, argues that while MRI has a role in prostate cancer detection, PSA and other molecular marker tests should be used earlier in sequence. He notes that while many healthcare providers are unhappy with the current state of early detection for prostate cancer, this has less to do with PSA’s merits as a test for determining the relative risk of prostate cancer, and more with a lack of good guidance on how to interpret it. Dr. Crawford argues that all men with a PSA greater than 1.5 should receive further evaluation, first for evidence of benign prostatic hyperplasia, and then for prostate cancer. Other molecular markers can help determine increased risk and help doctors decide whether or not to biopsy, and marker tests like ConfirmMDx can also help if a biopsy is inconclusive. Dr. Crawford concludes by noting that MRI is best used after patients have been biopsied.

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PC Markers Algorithm

E. David Crawford, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Grand Rounds in Urology and Professor of Urology at University of California, San Diego, discusses how the PC Markers algorithm simplifies the process of screening, diagnosing, and treating prostate cancer for primary care physicians and urologists. Family practitioners and internists order 90% of PSA tests in men, but may be overwhelmed with other health concerns in their patients when deciding to refer them to urologists. Dr. Crawford discusses data behind the identification of PSA >1.5ng/ml as the trigger point for screening, with a significant increase in cancer diagnosis between 1.5-4.0ng/ml. He also notes that 73% of PSA tests are still below the 1.5ng/ml threshold of eligibility for further PCa screening. Dr. Crawford then details the development of the PC Markers algorithm and how it combines a range of blood, urine, and imaging biomarkers to better inform primary care physicians and urologists in how to proceed with prostate cancer screening, diagnosis, and treatment.

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Point-Counterpoint: There is a Role for Currently Available Biomarkers/Genomics in the Risk Stratification of Prostate Cancer

E. David Crawford, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Grand Rounds in Urology, and Alan H. Bryce, MD, Chair of the Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology and Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, Arizona, present a Point-Counterpoint on the relative value of genomics and biomarkers in prostate cancer risk stratification. Dr. Crawford, presenting the pro side, argues that doctors need to do biomarker testing to know which patients to biopsy, follow closely, and treat with radiation. Dr. Bryce, presenting the con side, contends that while germline testing is beneficial, other biomarker tests have inconsistent results for prostate cancer patients.

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Challenging Cases in Advanced Prostate Cancer- mHSPC

E. David Crawford, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Grand Rounds in Urology and Professor of Urology at University of California, San Diego, gives his expertise on next generation biomarkers in prostate cancer screening. Firstly, Dr. Crawford qualifies the new standard of PSA >1.5 ng/mL, specifically how it aids in early detection of disease and acts as a surrogate for BPH, prostate cancer, and prostatitis. Following this, Dr. Crawford reviews the clinical needs and genomic markers of prostate cancer. In conclusion, he describes his algorithm for PSA screening.

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Next Generation Biomarkers – As Reflex, Combination, or First Line?

E. David Crawford, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Grand Rounds in Urology and Professor of Urology at University of California, San Diego, gives his expertise on next generation biomarkers in prostate cancer screening. Firstly, Dr. Crawford qualifies the new standard of PSA >1.5 ng/mL, specifically how it aids in early detection of disease and acts as a surrogate for BPH, prostate cancer, and prostatitis. Following this, Dr. Crawford reviews the clinical needs and genomic markers of prostate cancer. In conclusion, he describes his algorithm for PSA screening.

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